How to Prune a Fig Tree

by Alex Kountry
Updated on

Learn how to prune a fig tree to improve its shape, health, and fruit production.

Checkout this video:

Pruning Basics

Pruning is a horticultural and silvicultural practice involving the selective removal of certain parts of a plant, such as branches, buds, or roots. Fig trees are generally pruned for two main reasons: to promote fruit production and to manage the tree’s size and shape.

Why prune a fig tree

Pruning a fig tree is important for two reasons: to promote fruit production and to maintain the health of the tree. When pruning, always use clean, sharp pruning shears to make clean cuts. Avoid tearing or crushing the stems, which can promote disease.

The ideal time to prune a fig tree is in late winter or early spring, before the tree begins to produce new growth.

When to prune a fig tree

There are a few different schools of thought when it comes to pruning fig trees. Some people believe that it is best to prune in the late winter or early spring, before the tree begins to put out new growth. Others believe that pruning in the summer, after the tree has finished fruiting, is best. Ultimately, the best time to prune your fig tree will depend on what type of results you are hoping to achieve.

If you are looking to encourage fruit production, then pruning in the late winter or early spring is probably your best bet. This will help stimulate new growth, which will in turn lead to more fruit production. If you are looking to control the size or shape of your tree, then pruning in the summer after fruiting is probably your best option. This will help prevent excessive growth and allow you to better control the shape of your tree.

How to prune a fig tree

Pruning a fig tree is essential to its health and vigor, and greatly affects the quality and quantity of its fruit. The best time to prune a fig tree is in late winter or early spring, before the sap begins to flow and new growth appears.

There are two basic types of pruning – formative pruning, which is done to shape the tree, and fruit-bearing pruning, which is done to promote fruiting. Formative pruning is usually done when the tree is young, while fruit-bearing pruning is usually done every year on mature trees.

To prune a fig tree, start by removing any dead or diseased wood. Next, remove any crossing or rubbing branches. Finally, thin out the canopy to allow light and air circulation. You can also remove any suckers that are growing from the roots or trunk.

Pruning for Size

Fig trees can be pruned to control their size. When pruning for size, remove any dead or diseased wood, as well as any crossing or rubbing branches. Also remove any suckers that are growing from the tree’s roots. You can also cut back the branches to the desired length.

How to prune a fig tree for size

Pruning a fig tree for size is a simple process that should be done annually. The goal is to keep the tree small enough to fit in the space you have available, while still allowing it to produce fruit.

Here are the steps you need to take:

1. Begin by removing any dead or diseased branches. Cut these back to the point where they intersect with a healthy branch.

2. Next, prune any branches that are growing too close together. These will crowd out the other branches and prevent the fig tree from getting the sunlight and air circulation it needs to thrive.

3. Finally, cut back any branches that are growing out of control. These can be trimmed back by up to half their length.

Remember to make your cuts at a 45 degree angle so that water can drain away from the wound. Also, be sure to sterilize your pruning tools before and after use to prevent the spread of disease.

When to prune a fig tree for size

Fig trees are fast-growing and need to be pruned regularly to maintain their size and shape. The best time to prune a fig tree for size is in late winter or early spring, before the new growth begins.

To prune a fig tree for size, start by removing any dead or diseased branches. Then, cut back the remaining branches by about one-third. Finally, thin out the center of the tree to allow light and air to reach the inner branches.

Pruning for Shape

Pruning a fig tree is necessary to ensure its health and vitality. Pruning also helps to maintain the tree’s natural shape. When pruning, be sure to remove any dead or diseased branches, as well as any branches that are growing in the wrong direction.

How to prune a fig tree for shape

To keep your fig tree looking its best and bearing the most fruit, you’ll need to prune it regularly. Pruning also helps control the tree’s size, which is important if you have a limited amount of space.

Fig trees can be pruned in different ways, depending on the desired shape. For example, you can prune a fig tree into a vase shape, with three or more main branches coming off a central trunk. Or you can prune it into a single-trunked tree with a round canopy. Whichever way you prune your fig tree, be sure to sterilize your pruning tools before and after use to prevent the spread of disease.

Here are some step-by-step instructions for how to prune a fig tree for shape:
1. First, remove any dead, diseased, or dying wood from the tree. Cut these branches back to the point where they meet healthy wood.
2. Next, thin out the canopy of the tree by removing some of the lateral (side) branches. This will allow more sunlight and air to reach the center of the tree and help promote fruit production.
3. Finally, cut back any remaining branches to the desired length and shape. Be sure to make clean cuts at a 45-degree angle so that water doesn’t sit on the wound and cause disease.

When to prune a fig tree for shape

The best time to prune a fig tree for shape is in late winter or early spring, before the tree begins putting out new growth. You can prune up to one-third of the tree’s branches without jeopardizing its health.

Pruning fig trees helps to encourage new growth and maintain the tree’s shape. When pruning, be sure to remove any dead or diseased branches, as well as any crossed or rubbing branches. You can also remove any suckers that are growing from the base of the trunk or roots.

Photo of author

About the author

Alex Kountry

Alex Kountry is the founder of HayFarmGuy and has been a backyard farmer for over 10 years. Since then he has decided to write helpful articles that will help you become a better backyard farmer and know what to do. He also loves to play tennis and read books

Leave a Comment