How to Prune a Nandina

by Alex Kountry
Updated on

The Nandina, or Heavenly Bamboo, is a beautiful evergreen that adds interest to the landscape year-round. But this popular shrub can become overgrown and leggy if not properly pruned. Read on to learn how to prune a Nandina for best results.

Checkout this video:

Why You Should Prune Your Nandina

Over time, nandinas can become leggy and bare at the bottom with an unsightly thatch of dead leaves. To keep your nandina looking its best, you’ll need to prune it annually. Pruning also encourages new growth, which can help your nandina stay full and dense. Read on to learn how to prune a nandina.

To keep it from getting too big

Nandina, also known as heavenly bamboo, is an evergreen shrub that produces clusters of small white or pink flowers in the spring. It is often used as a landscape plant in U.S. Department of Agriculture plant hardiness zones 6 through 9 because it is easy to care for and tolerates a wide range of conditions. Although nandina can be left to grow without pruning, you may want to prune it to keep it from getting too big or to encourage it to produce more flowers.

The best time to prune nandina is in late winter or early spring, before new growth begins. You can use pruning shears to remove up to one-third of the plant’s total height. You can also remove any individual stems that are longer than you want them to be. If you want to encourage the plant to produce more flowers, you can cut back the stems by half after the plant blooms.

To encourage new growth

Pruning is essential to the health of your nandina, and it should be done on a yearly basis. Pruning encourages new growth, which means that your nandina will be able to produce more flowers and fruit. It also helps to keep the plant looking its best by removing any dead or damaged leaves and stems.

The best time to prune your nandina is in late winter or early spring, before new growth begins. You should use sharp, clean pruning shears, and make sure that you don’t damage the plant’s bark. To encourage new growth, prune the plant back by about one-third its height. You can also remove any dead or damaged leaves and stems at this time.

To improve the plant’s overall health

Pruning a nandina is essential for the plant’s health for several reasons. For one, pruning helps to encourage new growth. Additionally, pruning removes diseased or dead tissue from the plant, which can help to prevent the spread of disease. Finally, pruning can help to improve air circulation within the plant, which is crucial for preventing fungal growth.

How to Prune Your Nandina

Pruning a nandina is a simple process that can be done with a pair of shears. Begin by pruning any dead or dying leaves and branches. Next, prune any branches that are crossing or rubbing against each other. Finally, cut back any branches that are longer than the others. This will help to maintain the shape of the plant and encourage new growth.

Choose the right time of year

Pruning nandina is best done in late winter or early spring, just before new growth begins. You can prune again in mid-summer if needed, but avoid pruning in late summer or fall, as this can encourage new growth that won’t have time to harden off before winter.

Cut back the main stems

To keep your nandina compact and full, you’ll need to prune it regularly. The best time to do this is in late winter or early spring, before the plant starts putting out new growth.

Start by cutting back the main stems, or canes, to about 6 inches above ground level. This will encourage the plant to produce new growth that will be more compact and full. You can also remove any dead or damaged branches at this time.

Remove any dead or damaged leaves

Begin pruning a nandina by removing any dead or damaged leaves as soon as you notice them. These leaves can harbor pests or diseases which can spread to the rest of the plant, so it’s important to remove them as soon as possible. You can either snip them off with pruning shears or pull them off by hand.

Cut back any side shoots

To keep your nandina from getting too leggy, you will need to regularly prune it back. You can do this by cutting back any side shoots that are longer than about 6 inches. You can also cut back the main stem by a few inches every year or so to encourage new growth.

Photo of author

About the author

Alex Kountry

Alex Kountry is the founder of HayFarmGuy and has been a backyard farmer for over 10 years. Since then he has decided to write helpful articles that will help you become a better backyard farmer and know what to do. He also loves to play tennis and read books

Leave a Comment