How to Prune Boxwoods for the Best Shape and Growth

by Alex Kountry
Updated on

It’s easy to get the best shape and growth out of your boxwoods when you know how to prune them correctly. Here are some tips on how to prune boxwoods for the best results.

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Why you should prune your boxwoods

Pruning boxwoods helps to promote growth and keep the plant looking its best. Proper pruning techniques will also help to ensure that your boxwoods stay healthy and free of disease.

There are a few reasons why you should prune your boxwoods:

-To promote growth: Pruning stimulates new growth, which can help to fill in any gaps in the plant.
-To shape the plant: By carefully pruning away certain branches, you can give your boxwoods the desired shape.
-To remove diseased or damaged branches: Pruning away diseased or damaged branches helps to keep the plant healthy.
-To increase air circulation: Good air circulation is important for boxwoods, as it helps to prevent fungal diseases from taking hold.

When pruning your boxwoods, be sure to use sharp pruning shears and make clean cuts. Avoid causing damage to the plant by making jagged cuts or tearing branches.

The best time of year to prune your boxwoods

Most people think that the best time to prune their boxwoods is in the late fall or winter, but this is actually not the case. The best time to prune your boxwoods is in the early spring, before new growth begins. This will allow you to see the shape of the plant more clearly and make cleaner cuts.

How to prune your boxwoods for the best shape and growth

Pruning is a vital part of boxwood care. Proper pruning encourages strong growth, helps to maintain the plant’s desired shape, and removes any dead or diseased wood. The best time to prune boxwoods is in late winter or early spring, before new growth begins.

There are two basic types of pruning: shearing and selective pruning. Shearing involves cutting all of the branches back by the same amount, while selective pruning involves removing individual branches to achieve the desired shape.

Boxwoods can be sheared into a variety of shapes, such as spheres, cubes, or pyramids. To shear a plant, use hand shears or electric hedge trimmers. Begin by cutting the sides of the plant shorter than the top, then even out the top. Make sure to leave enough green growth on each branch so that the plant can continue to photosynthesize and produce new growth.

Selective pruning is generally reserved for more formal plantings, such as those found in English estate gardens. To selectively prune a boxwood, start by removing any dead or diseased wood. Then, remove any branches that are crossing or rubbing against each other. Finally, trim back any long or out-of-place branches to achieve the desired shape.

When pruning boxwoods, always make clean cuts just above where a branch meets another branch or the main stem of the plant. Avoid leaving stubs, which can lead to disease problems. Use sharp tools to make clean cuts, and disinfect them between cuts to prevent spreading diseases

The tools you will need to prune your boxwoods

Pruning boxwoods is a relatively easy task that can be accomplished with just a few tools. You will need a sharp pair of pruning shears, a pair of loppers, and a sharp saw. If you have a large number of boxwoods to prune, you may also want to consider renting a power pruner or pole saw.

Tips for pruning your boxwoods

Pruning is a vital part of boxwood care. It helps to encourage growth, control the shape of the plant, and remove dead or diseased leaves and branches. Boxwoods can be pruned at any time of year, but it’s best to do it in late winter or early spring before new growth begins.

Here are some tips for pruning your boxwoods:

-Start by removing any dead or diseased leaves and branches. Cut these back to the healthy wood.
-Next, trim back any branches that are growing out of shape or too long. Cut these back to the desired length or shape.
-Finally, thin out the plant by removing some of the branches from the center of the plant. This will help increase air circulation and prevent disease.
-Be sure to use sharp pruning shears and make clean cuts. This will help prevent disease and encourage new growth.

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About the author

Alex Kountry

Alex Kountry is the founder of HayFarmGuy and has been a backyard farmer for over 10 years. Since then he has decided to write helpful articles that will help you become a better backyard farmer and know what to do. He also loves to play tennis and read books

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