How to Prune Creeping Phlox

by Alex Kountry
Updated on

Follow these easy steps to prune your creeping phlox and keep it looking its best.

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Why Prune Creeping Phlox?

Pruning is an important part of keeping your creeping phlox healthy and looking its best. By pruning out dead or dying stems, you encourage new growth and help your plant to produce more flowers. Pruning also helps to keep the plant from getting too leggy.

To shape the plant

Creeping phlox (Phlox stolonifera) is a fragrant, evergreen groundcover that blooms in early spring. It is an excellent choice for covering slopes or mass plantings in shady areas of the landscape. Although it is a low-maintenance plant, it may require occasional pruning to shape the plant or remove spent flower blooms.

To encourage more blooms

Early spring is the best time to prune creeping phlox (Phlox subulata), a ground-covering plant that produces an abundance of pretty blooms in shades of pink, blue, lavender and white. The plant blooms on new growth, so pruning encourages more blooms. You can shear the plant after it blooms to help keep it compact and looking tidy.

To remove diseased or damaged plant parts

Creeping phlox (Phlox subulata) is a ground cover plant that is often used in rock gardens, slope stabilization, and as an edging plant. It gets its common name from its habit of creeping along the ground and sending up new shoots some distance from the parent plant. This trait can make it difficult to control the size and shape of the plant. Pruning is the best way to manage creeping phlox and keep it looking its best.

Pruning creeping phlox is a three-step process: first, cut back all of the stems by about one-third; second, thin out the center of the plant to improve air circulation; and third, shape the plant by pruning away any straggly or misshapen stems.

When to Prune Creeping Phlox

Creeping phlox (Phlox stolonifera) is a charming ground cover for sunny, well-drained locations. It typically forms a dense mat of evergreen leaves, with small purple, pink, or white flowers appearing in spring. Once established, it is quite drought tolerant. Although it is tolerant of light foot traffic, it does not do well if regularly mowed. If you want to keep it looking its best, you will need to give it a light pruning in late winter or early spring.

In late winter or early spring

Pruning time for creeping phlox is late winter or early spring, before new growth begins. This ensures that the plant will produce plenty of lush new growth for the coming season.

To keep your plant healthy and looking its best, annual pruning is a must. But don’t worry – it’s easy to do! Simply follow these steps and you’ll have beautiful, healthy creeping phlox in no time.

1. Remove any dead or diseased stems by cutting them off at the base of the plant.
2. Cut back any leggy or overgrown stems to encourage new growth.
3. Shape the plant as desired, making sure to leave enough growth for a full, lush look.
4. Sit back and enjoy your beautiful plants!

After the plant blooms

Creeping phlox (Phlox stolonifera) is a perennial groundcover that blooms in early spring. It covers itself with a mass of small, colorful flowers in shades of pink, purple and white. This low-growing plant spreads quickly and is often used to control erosion on slopes. Pruning creeping phlox is important to keep the plant blooming abundantly and to prevent it from spread out of control.

You can prune creeping phlox any time after it blooms in early spring. Cut back all the flowering stems by about half their length. This will encourage the plant to produce more stems, which will result in more flowers. You can also prune away any straggly or leggy stems that are growing outside of the plant’s desired shape.

After you prune, fertilize the plant with a general-purpose fertilizer to encourage new growth.

How to Prune Creeping Phlox

Creeping phlox (Phlox stolonifera) is a perennial flower that blooms in the spring. It is a low-growing plant that spreads by runners, or stolons. Creeping phlox is often used as a ground cover in gardens. It is also used in hanging baskets and as a edging plant. Pruning is a necessary part of caring for creeping phlox.

Cut back the plant by one-third its total height

Creeping phlox (Phlox subulata) is a low-growing, spreading perennial that is often used as a ground cover. It blooms in the spring with a profusion of small, five-petaled flowers in shades of pink, lavender, red or white. Because of its tendency to spread rapidly, creeping phlox often needs pruning to keep it from overtaking other plants in the garden. The best time to prune creeping phlox is immediately after it finishes blooming.

To prune creeping phlox, cut back the plant by one-third its total height. This will encourage new growth and ensure that the plant remains compact and doesn’t become leggy. Make sure to use sharp, clean pruning shears to prevent damage to the plant.

Remove any dead, diseased, or damaged plant parts

Creeping phlox (Phlox subulata) is a colorful, low-growing groundcover that blooms in early spring. It’s an easy plant to care for, and pruning is only necessary if you want to keep it tidy or control its spread.

To prune creeping phlox, start by removing any dead, diseased, or damaged plant parts. Cut back the plant by 1/3 to 1/2 its height after it blooms, using sharp pruning shears. Be sure to make your cuts just above a set of leaves, not right at the base of the plant. You can also cut back the plant in late winter before new growth begins.

Thin out the plant to encourage more blooms

Creeping phlox (Phlox stolonifera) is a flowering plant that produces beautiful blooms in shades of pink, lavender, blue and white. It is a low-growing plant that spreads quickly and can be used as a ground cover. Although it is a fairly carefree plant, it will benefit from yearly pruning to control its size and encourage more blooms.

Pruning should be done in late winter or early spring, before new growth begins. Use sharp pruning shears to remove one-third of the oldest stems all the way down to the ground. This will help to ensure that the plant doesn’t become too dense and will encourage new growth.

Tips for Pruning Creeping Phlox

Creeping phlox is a lovely groundcover for sunny areas with well-drained soil. It blooms profusely in spring, with pretty flowers in shades of pink, purple, blue, or white. If you give it a light trim after blooming, it will stay tidy and bloom well the following year. Here are some tips for pruning your creeping phlox.

Use sharp, clean pruning shears

To ensure a long-lived and disease-free plant, use sharp pruning shears and cut just above a leaf node. Sanitize the blades with rubbing alcohol or a 10% bleach solution in between cuts to avoid spreading any diseases that might be present.

Cut at a 45-degree angle

Pruning creeping phlox is a simple task that can ensure your plant remains healthy and vigorous. This low-growing perennial is a popular choice for groundcover, rock gardens, and borders. It typically blooms in late spring with a profusion of brightly colored flowers.

Creeping phlox can be cut back hard if necessary to rejuvenate the plant or to keep it within bounds. It is best to prune in early spring, before new growth begins. You can use sharp shears or a sharp knife to make clean, diagonal cuts at a 45-degree angle. Remove any dead, damaged, or diseased stems first. Then trim back the remaining stems to the desired height, making sure to leave at least some leaves on each stem.

Avoid pruning more than one-third of the plant at a time

Creeping phlox (Phlox stolonifera) is a perennial that displays its colorful flowers in early spring. It’s an attractive ground cover for slopes and rocky areas and does best in full sun. Once established, this plant is drought tolerant. Although creeping phlox requires little pruning, it may benefit from occasional shaping to help maintain its shape and prevent it from becoming too leggy. Avoid pruning more than one-third of the plant at a time.

Pruning creeping phlox immediately after it finishes blooming encourages new growth that will bloom the following year. To shape the plant, use sharp pruning shears to cut back any leggy stems to within 6 inches of the ground. You can also cut back the entire plant by one-third to one-half its height to encourage fuller, more compact growth.

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About the author

Alex Kountry

Alex Kountry is the founder of HayFarmGuy and has been a backyard farmer for over 10 years. Since then he has decided to write helpful articles that will help you become a better backyard farmer and know what to do. He also loves to play tennis and read books