How to Prune Endless Summer Hydrangea

by Alex Kountry
Updated on

Want to know how to prune your Endless Summer hydrangea for the best bloom possible? Check out this blog post for tips on the best time to prune and how to properly shape your plant.

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Why Prune Endless Summer Hydrangea

Endless Summer hydrangeas are a group of bigleaf hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla) cultivars that bloom on both old and new wood. Most other hydrangeas, including the popular mophead and lacecap varieties, bloom only on old wood. That means if you prune them in late winter or early spring, you risk cutting off all the flower buds and getting no blooms that year.

The original Endless Summer hydrangea is ‘Bailmer’ (Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Bailmer’). It was introduced in 2002 by Proven Winners ColorChoice Flowers. Since then, many other cultivars have been introduced, all with the same general characteristics: They bloom from June to September, they can be pruned in early spring without risking the loss of flowers, and they are extremely cold hardy, to minus 40 degrees Fahrenheit/-40 degrees Celsius.

When to Prune Endless Summer Hydrangea

Endless Summer hydrangea is a popular shrub that blooms from early summer to frost. The large clusters of flowers are often blue, but they can also be pink or white, depending on the variety. While this hydrangea is classified as a mophead type, the flowers are actually a special kind of lacecap.

If you’re wondering when to prune Endless Summer hydrangea, the answer depends on the type of plant you have. The original Endless Summer hydrangea (Hydrangea macrophylla ‘Bailmer’) blooms on new wood, so it can be pruned in late winter or early spring before new growth begins. However, many of the newer varieties, such as ‘Endless Summer Bloomstruck’ and ‘Endless Summer Twist-n-Shout,’ bloom on both old and new wood. This means they can still produce flowers even if you prune them in late summer or fall.

No matter what type of Endless Summer hydrangea you have, the best time to prune is right after it blooms. You can remove up to one-third of the plant’s length without affecting flowering. After bloom time, cut off any dead or damaged branches and then shape the plant to your liking.

How to Prune Endless Summer Hydrangea

Pruning an Endless Summer hydrangea is easy to do and the results are definitely worth the effort. This type of hydrangea blooms on both old and new wood, so it can produce flowers even if it’s not pruned. But, by pruning it correctly, you can encourage more blooms and a fuller, healthier plant.

Here’s how to prune an Endless Summer hydrangea:

First, decide when you want to prune your plant. Early spring or late winter is the best time to prune since that’s when the plant is dormant. Pruning at this time will also help shape the plant and encourage new growth.

Next, identify the oldest stems on the plant. These are the ones that should be removed first. Cut them back to about 6 inches above ground level. This will promote new growth from the base of the plant and help keep it full and bushy.

Now, look for any weak or diseased stems and remove them as well. These can be identified by their thinner appearance or discoloration. Cut these stems back to ground level.

Finally, trim back any remaining stems by a few inches to promote new growth and tidy up theplant’s appearance

Tips for Pruning Endless Summer Hydrangea

Pruning Endless Summer hydrangea is a bit different than pruning other types of hydrangeas. Here are some tips to help you get the best results:

-Start by removing any dead or diseased wood. Cut these branches back to just above where they join a healthy branch.

-Next, remove any branches that are growing in toward the center of the plant. These can be cut back to just above where they join a main branch.

-Now you can start shaping the plant by pruning back the longest branches. Cut these back to just above where they join a main branch. You want to try to create a rounded shape.

-Finally, if you want to encourage more flowering, you can prune back the tips of the main branches by about one third. Do this in late winter or early spring, just before new growth begins.

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About the author

Alex Kountry

Alex Kountry is the founder of HayFarmGuy and has been a backyard farmer for over 10 years. Since then he has decided to write helpful articles that will help you become a better backyard farmer and know what to do. He also loves to play tennis and read books

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