How to Prune Indeterminate Tomatoes

by Alex Kountry
Updated on

Are your indeterminate tomatoes getting too leggy and out of control? Learn how and when to prune your indeterminate tomatoes for a bountiful harvest of delicious fruit all season long!

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Introduction

Indeterminate tomatoes, also called vining tomatoes, are characterized by their long, vines that can grow up to 20 feet in length. These types of tomatoes are typically grown in warm climates and produce fruit all season long until the first frost. While indeterminate tomatoes require more initial care than determinate varieties, regular pruning will result in a healthier plant that is better able to resist disease and produce an abundance of delicious fruit.

Why You Should Prune Indeterminate Tomatoes

Indeterminate tomatoes continue to grow and produce fruit until the first hard frost of the season. Because they keep growing, they require more pruning than determinate varieties. By pruning indeterminate tomatoes, you can:
-Increase air circulation to reduce the risk of diseases
-Promote fruiting by channeling the plant’s energy into producing fruit
-Improve the flavor of the fruit by allowing it to Ripen fully

Pruning also makes it easier to support indeterminate tomato plants. Staking or trellising helps keep the plant upright and prevents the fruit from rotting on the ground.

How to Prune Indeterminate Tomatoes

Indeterminate tomatoes are a type of tomato that can grow very tall and produce fruit all season long. They are usually pruned to keep them under control and to encourage more fruit production. Pruning is a pretty simple process, but there are a few things you need to know before you start.

Step One: Determine When to Prune

The first step in pruning your indeterminate tomatoes is to determine when the best time to do so is. The best time to prune your indeterminate tomatoes is when they are about knee-high. This will give them enough time to grow and produce fruit, but not so much time that the plant becomes unmanageable.

If you wait too long to prune your indeterminate tomatoes, the plant will become bushy and produce less fruit. If you prune too early, the plant will not have enough time to grow and produce fruit.

Step Two: Cut Away Suckers

Once the main stem has been cut back, cut away any suckers that are growing from the plant. Suckers are small shoots that grow in the angle between the main stem and a branch. cutting them away will encourage the plant to put all its energy into producing fruit, rather than foliage.

Step Three: Pinch Off the Ends of Branches

Indeterminate tomato varieties continue to grow and produce fruit throughout the entire growing season. This type of tomato plant can become very large and sprawling, so pruning is necessary to keep the plant under control and to encourage fruit production. When pruning indeterminate tomatoes, you will need to pinch off the ends of branches, or “suckers,” as they are called. Suckers are new growth that appears in the joints, or crotch area, between the main stem and side branches of the plant. Pinching off these suckers will direct the plant’s energy into producing larger fruits rather than more foliage.

Conclusion

Pruning indeterminate tomatoes is a simple process that can be done with just a few snips of a sharp pair of pruning shears. The goal is to remove any dead or dying leaves and stems, as well as any suckers that are growing from the main stem. By pruning your plants, you will encourage healthier growth and larger, more plentiful fruits.

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About the author

Alex Kountry

Alex Kountry is the founder of HayFarmGuy and has been a backyard farmer for over 10 years. Since then he has decided to write helpful articles that will help you become a better backyard farmer and know what to do. He also loves to play tennis and read books

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