How to Prune Rose Bushes in Summer

by Alex Kountry
Updated on

Want to keep your rose bushes looking their best? Check out our tips on how to prune rose bushes in summer.

Checkout this video:

Why You Should Prune Your Rose Bushes

It may seem counter-intuitive to cut back on your rose bushes when they are in full bloom, but pruning can actually encourage more blooms. Roses produce more flowers when their canes are pruned. This is because pruning stimulates the plant to produce new growth.

To encourage more blooms

Rose bushes are beautiful flowering plants that add color and life to any garden. Though they require some special care, rose bushes are fairly easy to take care of, and pruning is one of the most important tasks in ensuring healthy plants.

Pruning rose bushes is typically done in early spring, before new growth begins. However, you may also need to prune your roses in summer if they become overgrown or if you want to encourage more blooms.

Here are a few tips on how to prune rose bushes in summer:

-Start by removing dead or dying branches. Cut these back to the main stem or lateral branch.
-Next, cut back any branches that are crossing or rubbing against each other. These can cause damage and prevent proper air circulation.
-Trim away any branches that are growing into the center of the bush. These can prevent new growth from getting the sunlight and air it needs.
-Finally, cut back any long stems by about one-third to encourage new growth and more blooms.

To get rid of diseased or dead wood

Diseased or dead wood should be the first priority when pruning your rose bushes in summer. Diseased wood will be discolored and may have canker, a sunken area on the stem. Dead wood will be dry and brittle and will snap off easily. Remove all diseased or dead wood, cutting it off cleanly at a 45-degree angle just above a leaf bud.

To shape the bush

Pruning rose bushes is important for two reasons – to shape the bush and to promote flowering. New growth on a rose bush comes from the tips of the canes. If you remove the tips, the canes will branch out, making the bush fuller. This is especially important on climbing roses, which need to be full to cover a large area. You can also prune to get rid of diseased or damaged canes, or to thin out a very full bush.

When to Prune Your Rose Bushes

Pruning rose bushes in summer may seem counterintuitive, but it’s actually the best time to do it. Summer pruning ensures that your rose bushes will have plenty of time to recover before winter sets in. It also allows you to shape the bush the way you want it to be.

Late spring or early summer

Pruning in late spring or early summer gives the plant time to heal the wounds before winter. It also allows the plant to produce new growth that will yield flowers the following season.

After the first flush of blooms

Once your bush has flowered, cut back the stems that flowered to just above an outward-facing bud or leaf. These cuts encourage your bush to grow new stems and produce even more flowers.

How to Prune Your Rose Bushes

Summer is the perfect time to prune your rose bushes. The heat helps to kill any diseases or pests that may be lurking on the leaves or stems of the plant. Pruning also helps to encourage new growth and produce healthier roses. Follow these steps to prune your rose bushes in summer.

Cut off dead or diseased wood

Start by pruning off any dead or diseased wood. You can identify dead wood by its dry, brown appearance, and diseased wood by cankerous lesions or blackened areas. Use pruning shears to make clean, sharp cuts just above a healthy set of leaves. Wear gloves to protect your hands from thorns.

Cut off any canes that are crossing or rubbing

When you are pruning your rose bushes, cut off any canes that are crossing or rubbing. You want to cut these canes off at an angle so that the water will run off of them. Also, make sure that you are not leaving any stubs when you are pruning the bush.

Trim back the remaining canes by about one-third

Rose bushes need to be pruned every year to encourage healthy growth and to produce the best possible blooms. The best time to prune your rose bushes is in late winter or early spring, before new growth begins.

If you missed the spring pruning window, you can still prune your roses, but you’ll need to be extra careful not to damage the new growth. Pruning in summer is generally not recommended, as it can shock the plant and stunt its growth. However, if you absolutely must prune your roses during the summer months, follow these tips to minimize the damage:

-Trim back the remaining canes by about one-third.
-Remove any dead or diseased canes.
-Cut back any canes that are crossing or rubbing against each other.
-Be sure to sterilize your pruning shears before and after use to avoid spreading disease.

Tips for Pruning Your Rose Bushes

Pruning rose bushes may seem like a daunting task, but with a few tips, it can be easy! First, you’ll want to wait until the summer to prune your rose bushes. This will ensure that the plant has time to grow back before the winter. Second, you’ll want to make sure that you cut back any dead or diseased wood. Finally, you’ll want to trim back the canes to about 6-8 inches.

Wear gloves to protect your hands

Pruning your rose bushes can be a daunting task, especially if you’re new to gardening. But with a few simple tips, you can easily learn how to prune your rose bushes the right way.

Start by wearing gloves to protect your hands from thorns. Then, using sharp pruning shears, cut back any dead or diseased branches. Next, cut back any branches that are growing out of control. Finally, cut back any branches that are crossing over each other.

Remember to make each cut at a 45-degree angle, and be sure to dispose of all the trimmings properly. With a little practice, you’ll be a pro at pruning your rose bushes in no time!

Use sharp, clean pruning shears

Pruning should be done with sharp, clean pruning shears to avoid tearing the plant and leaving it vulnerable to infection.

Before pruning, remove any dead, diseased, or weak growth. Cut these stems back to the main stem or lateral branch. Next, cut any crossing or rubbing branches so they don’t continue to damage each other.

After removing the dead, diseased, or weak growth, you can begin shaping your rose bush. First, find the main stem or lateral branch that you want to use as your central leader. From this central leader, you’ll want to allow 3-5 lateral branches to grow out evenly spaced around the stem. These will be your main scaffold branches. Cut any other stems that are growing out from the central leader so that only the 3-5 lateral branches remain.

Next, you’ll want to decide how many branches you want on each of your scaffold branches. For most rose bushes, 5-7 branches per scaffold branch is ideal. Once you’ve determined how many branches you want per scaffold branch, begin pruning away any additional stems so that only the desired number of branches remain.

Finally, cut away any stems that are longer than about 18 inches. These long stems are generally too weak to support flowers and they can also make your bush top-heavy and more likely to topple over in windy weather.

Disinfect your pruning shears after each cut

You can disinfect your pruning shears after each cut by using a household disinfectant or a solution of one part bleach to nine parts water. To prevent the spread of disease, it is important to clean your tools before moving on to another plant.

Photo of author

About the author

Alex Kountry

Alex Kountry is the founder of HayFarmGuy and has been a backyard farmer for over 10 years. Since then he has decided to write helpful articles that will help you become a better backyard farmer and know what to do. He also loves to play tennis and read books