Why Does My Cat Have Watery Eyes?

by Alex Kountry
Updated on

Why Does My Cat Have Watery Eyes? We explore the possible causes and what you can do to help your cat feel better.

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Causes of Watery Eyes in Cats

Watery eyes in cats can be caused by a number of things, from allergies to infection. If your cat has watery eyes, it’s important to take them to the vet to rule out any serious conditions. In the meantime, let’s take a look at some of the most common causes of watery eyes in cats.

Allergies

There are many things that can cause your cat to have watery eyes, but one of the most common causes is allergies. Allergies can be caused by anything from pollen to environmental irritants, and they can cause a host of symptoms, including watery eyes. If you think your cat’s watery eyes might be due to allergies, talk to your vet about the best way to treat them.

Infections

There are several different types of infections that can cause watery eyes in cats, including:

-Herpesvirus: Feline herpesvirus is one of the most common causes of watery eyes in cats. It’s a highly contagious virus that is typically spread through contact with infected saliva, nose discharge, or eye discharge. Symptoms include watery eyes, runny nose, fever, and mouth ulcers. The virus can cause lifelong infection, but most cats will only have periodic outbreaks.

-Calicivirus: Calicivirus is another common virus that can cause watery eyes in cats. It’s most often spread through contact with infected saliva, nose secretions, or eye secretions. Symptoms include fever, runny nose, oral ulcers, and limb weakness.

-Chlamydia: Chlamydia is a bacteria that can cause watery eyes in cats as well as other respiratory infections. It’s typically spread through contact with infected saliva, nose secretions, or eye secretions. Symptoms include watery eyes, runny nose, and diarrhea.

-Bordetella: Bordetella is a bacteria that can cause watery eyes in cats as well as other respiratory infections. It’s typically spread through contact with infected saliva, nose secretions, or eye secretions. Symptoms include watery eyes, runny nose, and cough.

Tumors

One possible cause for watery eyes in cats is a tumor. Tumors can grow in any number of places, including the eye itself, the glands that produce tears, and the nerves that send signals from the brain to the eye. While not all tumors are cancerous, they can still cause a build-up of fluid in the eye, which leads to watery eyes. If your cat has a tumor, you may also notice other symptoms, such as changes in vision, swelling, and redness. If you notice any of these symptoms, it’s important to take your cat to the vet right away for an examination.

Signs and Symptoms of Watery Eyes in Cats

Watery eyes in cats can be a sign of many different things. It could be a sign of infection, allergies, or even a blocked tear duct. If your cat’s eyes are watery, it is important to take them to the vet to rule out any serious medical conditions. Here are some more signs and symptoms to look out for.

Excessive Tearing

Excessive tearing in cats, also called epiphora, is a condition in which the eyes produce an abnormal amount of tears. While a small amount of tearing is normal, and actually helps to keep the eyes healthy by washing away debris and debris, excessive tearing can cause a number of problems.

The most common cause of excessive tearing in cats is blocked tear ducts. When the ducts become blocked, the tears have nowhere to go and they overflow onto the face. This can lead to staining of the fur around the eyes, as well as irritation and infection.

Other causes of excessive tearing include allergies, eye injuries, respiratory infections, and foreign bodies in the eye. If your cat’s tear ducts are not blocked and you cannot determine the cause of the excessive tearing, it is important to take your cat to the vet for further evaluation.

Redness

One of the most common signs of watery eyes in cats is redness of the eye. This can be due to a number of different conditions, including allergies, infection, or injury. If your cat’s eyes are red, it is important to have them examined by a veterinarian as soon as possible to determine the cause and get appropriate treatment.

Other signs of watery eyes in cats include discharge from the eyes, squinting or blinking more than usual, pawing at the eyes, and rubbing the face. If you notice any of these signs, take your cat to the vet for an evaluation.

Swelling

If your cat’s eyes are watery, it could be a sign of allergies, infection, or another underlying health condition. allergies are the most common cause of watery eyes in cats, but an infection can also cause your cat’s eyes to swell and produce excessive tears. If your cat’s eyes are watery and accompanied by other symptoms such as redness, discharge, or squinting, it is important to take them to the vet for an evaluation.

Diagnosing Watery Eyes in Cats

Watery eyes in cats can be caused by a number of different things, ranging from allergies to infections. If your cat’s eyes are watery, it’s important to take them to the vet to get diagnosed. The vet will be able to tell you what is causing the watery eyes and how to treat it.

Physical Examination

In addition to taking a thorough history from the cat’s guardians, your veterinarian will give your cat a complete physical examination. This will help to generate a list of possible differential diagnoses and help to focus subsequent diagnostic testing.

The veterinarian will assess the cat’s general health and perform a detailed examination of the eyes. This will include an evaluation of the:
-eyelid margins
-conjunctival sacs
-iris
-cornea
-pupils
-lens
-vitreous humor
The veterinarian may also use specialized equipment to examine the structures within the eye, including the retina and optic nerve.

Blood Tests

Your veterinarian may recommend a complete blood count (CBC) and a serum biochemistry panel to evaluate your cat’s overall health and to look for any underlying conditions that could be causing the watery eyes. A CBC measures the number of various types of cells in your cat’s blood and can help determine if there is an infection present. A serum biochemistry panel measures the levels of enzymes and other chemicals in your cat’s blood and can help diagnose kidney or liver disease, which can also cause watery eyes.

Imaging Studies

Imaging studies are often not necessary to diagnose the underlying cause of your cat’s watery eyes. In some cases, though, your veterinarian may recommend one or more of the following imaging tests to get a better look at the structures in your cat’s eye and head:

X-rays: X-rays can be useful for diagnosis conditions that cause bone abnormalities or changes, such as cancer.

Ultrasound: An ultrasound uses sound waves to create an image of the structures inside your cat’s body. This test is useful for diagnostic conditions that cause abdominal swelling.

CT scan: A CT scan creates a cross-sectional image of the structures inside your cat’s body. This test can be useful for diagnosing conditions that cause abnormalities in soft tissues, such as tumors.

MRI: An MRI uses magnetic waves to create an image of the structures inside your cat’s body. This test can be useful for diagnosing conditions that cause abnormalities in soft tissues, such as tumors.

Treatment of Watery Eyes in Cats

If you notice your cat has watery eyes, it may be due to allergies, a foreign body such as a piece of dust or grass, or a more serious condition such as an infection. Treatment will vary depending on the cause of your cat’s watery eyes. If your cat’s eyes are only watery occasionally and don’t seem to be bothering him, you may not need to take him to the vet. However, if the watery eyes are accompanied by other symptoms, such as lethargy, fever, or discharge, it’s time to make an appointment with the vet.

Medications

There are a number of over-the-counter and prescription medications that can be used to treat watery eyes in cats. Depending on the underlying cause of the condition, your veterinarian may recommend one or more of the following:

-Artificial tears or lubricating ointments: These can be used to help lubricate the surface of the eye and treat mild cases of watery eyes.
-Anti-allergy medications: If allergies are the cause of your cat’s watery eyes, antihistamines or other allergy medications may be prescribed to help relieve symptoms.
-Antibiotics: If an infection is present, antibiotics may be necessary to clear it up.
– Surgery: In some cases, surgery may be needed to remove a blockage or correct a problem with the eye’s drainage system.

Surgery

If the tear ducts are completely blocked, your veterinarian may recommend surgery to open them. This is a very common and successful procedure.

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About the author

Alex Kountry

Alex Kountry is the founder of HayFarmGuy and has been a backyard farmer for over 10 years. Since then he has decided to write helpful articles that will help you become a better backyard farmer and know what to do. He also loves to play tennis and read books

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